Court of Appeal extends permission in Afghan Interpreters challenge

13 Jan 2015 | by Caroline Sweeney

The Court of Appeal today granted permission on an additional ground in the ongoing judicial review claim by the Afghan local staff who worked for the UK Government in Afghanistan.

The Claimants gave loyal, important and dangerous service as interpreters to the UK armed forces. As a result of their work for the UK, they and their families have suffered serious injuries in Taliban attacks and been subjected to threats to their life and intimidation. They argue that the protection and benefits offered to them by the UK Government remain far more limited than what was offered to Iraqi interpreters working for the UK under similarly difficult circumstances in Iraq.  

The High Court previously granted permission for the claim that the UK Government’s decision not to afford the Claimants the same benefits and protections as their Iraqi counterparts amounted to unlawful discrimination. Today the Court of Appeal extended permission for a further challenge that the Government failed to comply with its public sector equality duties when reaching the decision.

Nikolaus Grubeck appeared for the Afghan interpreters.

The case has been featured in various press, including: